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Time since SARS-CoV-2 infection and humoral immune response following BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination. / Amsterdam UMC COVID-19 S3/HCW study group.

In: EBioMedicine, Vol. 72, 103589, 01.10.2021.

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Amsterdam UMC COVID-19 S3/HCW study group. / Time since SARS-CoV-2 infection and humoral immune response following BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination. In: EBioMedicine. 2021 ; Vol. 72.

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@article{e823cbc71bb74ae0b3d9abf4ff91a9a0,
title = "Time since SARS-CoV-2 infection and humoral immune response following BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination",
abstract = "Background: To optimise the use of available SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, some advocate delaying second vaccination for individuals infected within six months. We studied whether post-vaccination immune response is equally potent in individuals infected over six months prior to vaccination. Methods: We tested serum IgG binding to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and neutralising capacity in 110 healthcare workers, before and after both BNT162b2 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccinations. We compared outcomes between participants with more recent infection (n = 18, median two months, IQR 2-3), with infection-vaccination interval over six months (n = 19, median nine months, IQR 9-10), and to those not previously infected (n = 73). Findings: Both recently and earlier infected participants showed comparable humoral immune responses after a single mRNA vaccination, while exceeding those of previously uninfected persons after two vaccinations with 2.5 fold (p = 0.003) and 3.4 fold (p < 0.001) for binding antibody levels, and 6.4 and 7.2 fold for neutralisation titres, respectively (both p < 0.001). The second vaccine dose yielded no further substantial improvement of the humoral response in the previously infected participants (0.97 fold, p = 0.92), while it was associated with a 4 fold increase in antibody binding levels and 18 fold increase in neutralisation titres in previously uninfected participants (both p < 0.001). Adjustment for potential confounding of sex and age did not affect these findings. Interpretation: Delaying the second vaccination in individuals infected up to ten months prior may constitute a more efficient use of limited vaccine supplies. Funding: Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw; Corona Research Fund Amsterdam UMC; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.",
keywords = "BNT162b2, COVID-19, Humoral immune response, Neutralisation, SARS-CoV-2, Vaccine",
author = "Brent Appelman and {van der Straten}, Karlijn and Lavell, {A. H. Ayesha} and Michiel Schinkel and Slim, {Marleen A.} and Meliawati Poniman and Burger, {Judith A.} and Melissa Oomen and Khadija Tejjani and Vlaar, {Alexander P. J.} and Wiersinga, {W. Joost} and Smulders, {Yvo M.} and {van Vught}, {Lonneke A.} and {Amsterdam UMC COVID-19 S3/HCW study group} and Sanders, {Rogier W.} and {van Gils}, {Marit J.} and Bomers, {Marije K.} and Sikkens, {Jonne J.}",
note = "Funding Information: We thank all participating healthcare workers of Amsterdam UMC, who took time to facilitate this study in the midst of the pandemic, for their contribution. The study was funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw (Project Number 10430022010023 ), the Corona Research Fund Amsterdam UMC and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Grants INV-002022 , INV-008818 to R.W.S, and INV-024617 to M.J.v.G.). Funding Information: M. Bomers and J. Sikkens report grants from Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw, grants from Amsterdam UMC Corona Research Funds, during the conduct of the study. All other authors declare no conflict of interests. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Author(s) Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103589",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
journal = "EBioMedicine",
issn = "2352-3964",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time since SARS-CoV-2 infection and humoral immune response following BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination

AU - Appelman, Brent

AU - van der Straten, Karlijn

AU - Lavell, A. H. Ayesha

AU - Schinkel, Michiel

AU - Slim, Marleen A.

AU - Poniman, Meliawati

AU - Burger, Judith A.

AU - Oomen, Melissa

AU - Tejjani, Khadija

AU - Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

AU - Wiersinga, W. Joost

AU - Smulders, Yvo M.

AU - van Vught, Lonneke A.

AU - Amsterdam UMC COVID-19 S3/HCW study group

AU - Sanders, Rogier W.

AU - van Gils, Marit J.

AU - Bomers, Marije K.

AU - Sikkens, Jonne J.

N1 - Funding Information: We thank all participating healthcare workers of Amsterdam UMC, who took time to facilitate this study in the midst of the pandemic, for their contribution. The study was funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw (Project Number 10430022010023 ), the Corona Research Fund Amsterdam UMC and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Grants INV-002022 , INV-008818 to R.W.S, and INV-024617 to M.J.v.G.). Funding Information: M. Bomers and J. Sikkens report grants from Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw, grants from Amsterdam UMC Corona Research Funds, during the conduct of the study. All other authors declare no conflict of interests. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Author(s) Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/10/1

Y1 - 2021/10/1

N2 - Background: To optimise the use of available SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, some advocate delaying second vaccination for individuals infected within six months. We studied whether post-vaccination immune response is equally potent in individuals infected over six months prior to vaccination. Methods: We tested serum IgG binding to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and neutralising capacity in 110 healthcare workers, before and after both BNT162b2 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccinations. We compared outcomes between participants with more recent infection (n = 18, median two months, IQR 2-3), with infection-vaccination interval over six months (n = 19, median nine months, IQR 9-10), and to those not previously infected (n = 73). Findings: Both recently and earlier infected participants showed comparable humoral immune responses after a single mRNA vaccination, while exceeding those of previously uninfected persons after two vaccinations with 2.5 fold (p = 0.003) and 3.4 fold (p < 0.001) for binding antibody levels, and 6.4 and 7.2 fold for neutralisation titres, respectively (both p < 0.001). The second vaccine dose yielded no further substantial improvement of the humoral response in the previously infected participants (0.97 fold, p = 0.92), while it was associated with a 4 fold increase in antibody binding levels and 18 fold increase in neutralisation titres in previously uninfected participants (both p < 0.001). Adjustment for potential confounding of sex and age did not affect these findings. Interpretation: Delaying the second vaccination in individuals infected up to ten months prior may constitute a more efficient use of limited vaccine supplies. Funding: Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw; Corona Research Fund Amsterdam UMC; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

AB - Background: To optimise the use of available SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, some advocate delaying second vaccination for individuals infected within six months. We studied whether post-vaccination immune response is equally potent in individuals infected over six months prior to vaccination. Methods: We tested serum IgG binding to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and neutralising capacity in 110 healthcare workers, before and after both BNT162b2 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccinations. We compared outcomes between participants with more recent infection (n = 18, median two months, IQR 2-3), with infection-vaccination interval over six months (n = 19, median nine months, IQR 9-10), and to those not previously infected (n = 73). Findings: Both recently and earlier infected participants showed comparable humoral immune responses after a single mRNA vaccination, while exceeding those of previously uninfected persons after two vaccinations with 2.5 fold (p = 0.003) and 3.4 fold (p < 0.001) for binding antibody levels, and 6.4 and 7.2 fold for neutralisation titres, respectively (both p < 0.001). The second vaccine dose yielded no further substantial improvement of the humoral response in the previously infected participants (0.97 fold, p = 0.92), while it was associated with a 4 fold increase in antibody binding levels and 18 fold increase in neutralisation titres in previously uninfected participants (both p < 0.001). Adjustment for potential confounding of sex and age did not affect these findings. Interpretation: Delaying the second vaccination in individuals infected up to ten months prior may constitute a more efficient use of limited vaccine supplies. Funding: Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development ZonMw; Corona Research Fund Amsterdam UMC; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

KW - BNT162b2

KW - COVID-19

KW - Humoral immune response

KW - Neutralisation

KW - SARS-CoV-2

KW - Vaccine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85115628201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103589

DO - 10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103589

M3 - Article

C2 - 34571363

VL - 72

JO - EBioMedicine

JF - EBioMedicine

SN - 2352-3964

M1 - 103589

ER -

ID: 19886227