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The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection. / Grebely, Jason; Page, Kimberly; Sacks-Davis, Rachel et al.

In: Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), Vol. 59, No. 1, 2014, p. 109-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Harvard

Grebely, J, Page, K, Sacks-Davis, R, van der Loeff, MS, Rice, TM, Bruneau, J, Morris, MD, Hajarizadeh, B, Amin, J, Cox, AL, Kim, AY, McGovern, BH, Schinkel, J, George, J, Shoukry, NH, Lauer, GM, Maher, L, Lloyd, AR, Hellard, M, Dore, GJ, Prins, M & AUTHOR GROUP 2014, 'The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection', Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 109-120. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.26639

APA

Grebely, J., Page, K., Sacks-Davis, R., van der Loeff, M. S., Rice, T. M., Bruneau, J., Morris, M. D., Hajarizadeh, B., Amin, J., Cox, A. L., Kim, A. Y., McGovern, B. H., Schinkel, J., George, J., Shoukry, N. H., Lauer, G. M., Maher, L., Lloyd, A. R., Hellard, M., ... AUTHOR GROUP (2014). The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection. Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), 59(1), 109-120. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.26639

Vancouver

Grebely J, Page K, Sacks-Davis R, van der Loeff MS, Rice TM, Bruneau J et al. The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection. Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.). 2014;59(1):109-120. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.26639

Author

Grebely, Jason ; Page, Kimberly ; Sacks-Davis, Rachel et al. / The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection. In: Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.). 2014 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 109-120.

BibTeX

@article{5c00cb413b7444cdaefc4de980f8b9a7,
title = "The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection",
abstract = "Although 20%-40% of persons with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection demonstrate spontaneous clearance, the time course and factors associated with clearance remain poorly understood. We investigated the time to spontaneous clearance and predictors among participants with acute HCV using Cox proportional hazards analyses. Data for this analysis were drawn from an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts evaluating outcomes after acute HCV infection. Among 632 participants with acute HCV, 35% were female, 82% were Caucasian, 49% had interleukin-28 (IL28)B CC genotype (rs12979860), 96% had injected drugs ever, 47% were infected with HCV genotype 1, and 7% had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Twenty-eight percent were HCV antibody negative/RNA positive at the time of acute HCV detection (early acute HCV). During follow-up, spontaneous clearance occurred in 173 of 632, and at 1 year after infection, 25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21, 29) had cleared virus. Among those with clearance, the median time to clearance was 16.5 weeks (IQR: 10.5, 33.4), with 34%, 67%, and 83% demonstrating clearance at 3, 6, and 12 months. Adjusting for age, factors independently associated with time to spontaneous clearance included female sex (adjusted hazards ratio [AHR]: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.48, 3.18), IL28B CC genotype (versus CT/TT; AHR, 2.26; 95% CI: 1.52, 3.34), and HCV genotype 1 (versus non-genotype 1; AHR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.30). The effect of IL28B genotype and HCV genotype on spontaneous clearance was greater among females, compared to males. Conclusions: Female sex, favorable IL28B genotype, and HCV genotype 1 are independent predictors of spontaneous clearance. Further research is required to elucidate the observed sex-based differences in HCV control",
author = "Jason Grebely and Kimberly Page and Rachel Sacks-Davis and {van der Loeff}, {Maarten Schim} and Rice, {Thomas M.} and Julie Bruneau and Morris, {Meghan D.} and Behzad Hajarizadeh and Janaki Amin and Cox, {Andrea L.} and Kim, {Arthur Y.} and McGovern, {Barbara H.} and Janke Schinkel and Jacob George and Shoukry, {Naglaa H.} and Lauer, {Georg M.} and Lisa Maher and Lloyd, {Andrew R.} and Margaret Hellard and Dore, {Gregory J.} and Maria Prins and {AUTHOR GROUP} and Georg Lauer and Meghan Morris and Judy Hahn and Megan Rilla and Maryam Alavi and Rachel Bouchard and Jennifer Evans and Bart Grady and Jasneet Aneja and Suzy Teutsch and Bethany White and Brittany Wells and Geng Zang and Tanya Applegate and Gail Matthews and Barbara Yeung and Prince, {Leslie Erin} and Elise Roy and Anna Bates and Jarliene Enriquez and Sammy Chow and Luke McCredie and Campbell Aitken and Joseph Doyle and Tim Spelman",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/hep.26639",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "109--120",
journal = "Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)",
issn = "0270-9139",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection

AU - Grebely, Jason

AU - Page, Kimberly

AU - Sacks-Davis, Rachel

AU - van der Loeff, Maarten Schim

AU - Rice, Thomas M.

AU - Bruneau, Julie

AU - Morris, Meghan D.

AU - Hajarizadeh, Behzad

AU - Amin, Janaki

AU - Cox, Andrea L.

AU - Kim, Arthur Y.

AU - McGovern, Barbara H.

AU - Schinkel, Janke

AU - George, Jacob

AU - Shoukry, Naglaa H.

AU - Lauer, Georg M.

AU - Maher, Lisa

AU - Lloyd, Andrew R.

AU - Hellard, Margaret

AU - Dore, Gregory J.

AU - Prins, Maria

AU - AUTHOR GROUP

AU - Lauer, Georg

AU - Morris, Meghan

AU - Hahn, Judy

AU - Rilla, Megan

AU - Alavi, Maryam

AU - Bouchard, Rachel

AU - Evans, Jennifer

AU - Grady, Bart

AU - Aneja, Jasneet

AU - Teutsch, Suzy

AU - White, Bethany

AU - Wells, Brittany

AU - Zang, Geng

AU - Applegate, Tanya

AU - Matthews, Gail

AU - Yeung, Barbara

AU - Prince, Leslie Erin

AU - Roy, Elise

AU - Bates, Anna

AU - Enriquez, Jarliene

AU - Chow, Sammy

AU - McCredie, Luke

AU - Aitken, Campbell

AU - Doyle, Joseph

AU - Spelman, Tim

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Although 20%-40% of persons with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection demonstrate spontaneous clearance, the time course and factors associated with clearance remain poorly understood. We investigated the time to spontaneous clearance and predictors among participants with acute HCV using Cox proportional hazards analyses. Data for this analysis were drawn from an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts evaluating outcomes after acute HCV infection. Among 632 participants with acute HCV, 35% were female, 82% were Caucasian, 49% had interleukin-28 (IL28)B CC genotype (rs12979860), 96% had injected drugs ever, 47% were infected with HCV genotype 1, and 7% had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Twenty-eight percent were HCV antibody negative/RNA positive at the time of acute HCV detection (early acute HCV). During follow-up, spontaneous clearance occurred in 173 of 632, and at 1 year after infection, 25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21, 29) had cleared virus. Among those with clearance, the median time to clearance was 16.5 weeks (IQR: 10.5, 33.4), with 34%, 67%, and 83% demonstrating clearance at 3, 6, and 12 months. Adjusting for age, factors independently associated with time to spontaneous clearance included female sex (adjusted hazards ratio [AHR]: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.48, 3.18), IL28B CC genotype (versus CT/TT; AHR, 2.26; 95% CI: 1.52, 3.34), and HCV genotype 1 (versus non-genotype 1; AHR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.30). The effect of IL28B genotype and HCV genotype on spontaneous clearance was greater among females, compared to males. Conclusions: Female sex, favorable IL28B genotype, and HCV genotype 1 are independent predictors of spontaneous clearance. Further research is required to elucidate the observed sex-based differences in HCV control

AB - Although 20%-40% of persons with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection demonstrate spontaneous clearance, the time course and factors associated with clearance remain poorly understood. We investigated the time to spontaneous clearance and predictors among participants with acute HCV using Cox proportional hazards analyses. Data for this analysis were drawn from an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts evaluating outcomes after acute HCV infection. Among 632 participants with acute HCV, 35% were female, 82% were Caucasian, 49% had interleukin-28 (IL28)B CC genotype (rs12979860), 96% had injected drugs ever, 47% were infected with HCV genotype 1, and 7% had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Twenty-eight percent were HCV antibody negative/RNA positive at the time of acute HCV detection (early acute HCV). During follow-up, spontaneous clearance occurred in 173 of 632, and at 1 year after infection, 25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21, 29) had cleared virus. Among those with clearance, the median time to clearance was 16.5 weeks (IQR: 10.5, 33.4), with 34%, 67%, and 83% demonstrating clearance at 3, 6, and 12 months. Adjusting for age, factors independently associated with time to spontaneous clearance included female sex (adjusted hazards ratio [AHR]: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.48, 3.18), IL28B CC genotype (versus CT/TT; AHR, 2.26; 95% CI: 1.52, 3.34), and HCV genotype 1 (versus non-genotype 1; AHR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.30). The effect of IL28B genotype and HCV genotype on spontaneous clearance was greater among females, compared to males. Conclusions: Female sex, favorable IL28B genotype, and HCV genotype 1 are independent predictors of spontaneous clearance. Further research is required to elucidate the observed sex-based differences in HCV control

U2 - 10.1002/hep.26639

DO - 10.1002/hep.26639

M3 - Article

C2 - 23908124

VL - 59

SP - 109

EP - 120

JO - Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)

JF - Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)

SN - 0270-9139

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 2186581