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Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis. / Henselmans, Inge; Helgeson, Vicki S.; Seltman, Howard; de Vries, Jakob; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

In: Health psychology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 2010, p. 160-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Harvard

Henselmans, I, Helgeson, VS, Seltman, H, de Vries, J, Sanderman, R & Ranchor, AV 2010, 'Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis', Health psychology, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 160-168. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017806

APA

Henselmans, I., Helgeson, V. S., Seltman, H., de Vries, J., Sanderman, R., & Ranchor, A. V. (2010). Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis. Health psychology, 29(2), 160-168. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017806

Vancouver

Henselmans I, Helgeson VS, Seltman H, de Vries J, Sanderman R, Ranchor AV. Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis. Health psychology. 2010;29(2):160-168. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017806

Author

Henselmans, Inge ; Helgeson, Vicki S. ; Seltman, Howard ; de Vries, Jakob ; Sanderman, Robbert ; Ranchor, Adelita V. / Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis. In: Health psychology. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 160-168.

BibTeX

@article{e4b83edf0ff0484aa00f75f64ad524ef,
title = "Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: In this article, we aim to (a) identify distinct trajectories of psychological distress in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis in women treated with adjuvant therapy and (b) explore possible predictors of these trajectories, that is, demographic, medical, and personal characteristics. METHOD: The 171 patients were assessed after diagnosis, after surgery, after adjuvant treatment, in the reentry phase, and in the (short-term) survivorship phase (2 and 6 months after the end of treatment, respectively). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Psychological distress was assessed with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. RESULTS: There were four trajectories of distress: a group that experienced no distress (36.3%), a group that experienced distress only in the active treatment phase (33.3%), a group that experienced distress in the reentry and survivorship phase (15.2%), and a group that experienced chronic distress (15.2%). Personality and physical complaints resulting from adjuvant treatment could distinguish the distress trajectories. Mastery was the only unique predictor. CONCLUSION: Most patients were not distressed in response to breast cancer or only temporarily so. Yet, a minority of patients became or remained distressed after the end of treatment",
author = "Inge Henselmans and Helgeson, {Vicki S.} and Howard Seltman and {de Vries}, Jakob and Robbert Sanderman and Ranchor, {Adelita V.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1037/a0017806",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "160--168",
journal = "Health psychology",
issn = "0278-6133",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identification and prediction of distress trajectories in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis

AU - Henselmans, Inge

AU - Helgeson, Vicki S.

AU - Seltman, Howard

AU - de Vries, Jakob

AU - Sanderman, Robbert

AU - Ranchor, Adelita V.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - OBJECTIVE: In this article, we aim to (a) identify distinct trajectories of psychological distress in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis in women treated with adjuvant therapy and (b) explore possible predictors of these trajectories, that is, demographic, medical, and personal characteristics. METHOD: The 171 patients were assessed after diagnosis, after surgery, after adjuvant treatment, in the reentry phase, and in the (short-term) survivorship phase (2 and 6 months after the end of treatment, respectively). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Psychological distress was assessed with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. RESULTS: There were four trajectories of distress: a group that experienced no distress (36.3%), a group that experienced distress only in the active treatment phase (33.3%), a group that experienced distress in the reentry and survivorship phase (15.2%), and a group that experienced chronic distress (15.2%). Personality and physical complaints resulting from adjuvant treatment could distinguish the distress trajectories. Mastery was the only unique predictor. CONCLUSION: Most patients were not distressed in response to breast cancer or only temporarily so. Yet, a minority of patients became or remained distressed after the end of treatment

AB - OBJECTIVE: In this article, we aim to (a) identify distinct trajectories of psychological distress in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis in women treated with adjuvant therapy and (b) explore possible predictors of these trajectories, that is, demographic, medical, and personal characteristics. METHOD: The 171 patients were assessed after diagnosis, after surgery, after adjuvant treatment, in the reentry phase, and in the (short-term) survivorship phase (2 and 6 months after the end of treatment, respectively). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Psychological distress was assessed with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. RESULTS: There were four trajectories of distress: a group that experienced no distress (36.3%), a group that experienced distress only in the active treatment phase (33.3%), a group that experienced distress in the reentry and survivorship phase (15.2%), and a group that experienced chronic distress (15.2%). Personality and physical complaints resulting from adjuvant treatment could distinguish the distress trajectories. Mastery was the only unique predictor. CONCLUSION: Most patients were not distressed in response to breast cancer or only temporarily so. Yet, a minority of patients became or remained distressed after the end of treatment

U2 - 10.1037/a0017806

DO - 10.1037/a0017806

M3 - Article

C2 - 20230089

VL - 29

SP - 160

EP - 168

JO - Health psychology

JF - Health psychology

SN - 0278-6133

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 1050223