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Homogenization of face neural representation during development. / Tian, Xue; Hao, Xin; Song, Yiying et al.

In: Developmental cognitive neuroscience, Vol. 52, 101040, 01.12.2021.

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Harvard

Tian, X, Hao, X, Song, Y & Liu, J 2021, 'Homogenization of face neural representation during development', Developmental cognitive neuroscience, vol. 52, 101040. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2021.101040

APA

Tian, X., Hao, X., Song, Y., & Liu, J. (2021). Homogenization of face neural representation during development. Developmental cognitive neuroscience, 52, [101040]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2021.101040

Vancouver

Tian X, Hao X, Song Y, Liu J. Homogenization of face neural representation during development. Developmental cognitive neuroscience. 2021 Dec 1;52. 101040. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2021.101040

Author

Tian, Xue ; Hao, Xin ; Song, Yiying et al. / Homogenization of face neural representation during development. In: Developmental cognitive neuroscience. 2021 ; Vol. 52.

BibTeX

@article{5ed95a720c714ee4b88c9adc095b626e,
title = "Homogenization of face neural representation during development",
abstract = "Extensive studies have demonstrated that face processing ability develops gradually during development until adolescence. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. One hypothesis is that children and adults represent faces in qualitatively different fashions with different group templates. An alternative hypothesis emphasizes the development as a quantitative change with a decrease of variation in representations. To test these hypotheses, we used between-participant correlation to measure activation pattern similarity both within and between late-childhood children and adults. We found that activation patterns for faces in the fusiform face area and occipital face area were less similar within the children group than within the adults group, indicating children had a greater variation in representing faces. Interestingly, the activation pattern similarity of children to their own group template was not significantly larger than that to adults{\textquoteright} template, suggesting children and adults shared a template in representing faces. Further, the decrease in representation variance was likely a general principle in the ventral visual cortex, as a similar result was observed in a scene-selective region when perceiving scenes. Taken together, our study provides evidence that development of object representation may result from a homogenization process that shifts from greater variance in late-childhood to homogeneity in adults.",
keywords = "Between-Participant Pattern Similarity, Representation development, Representation homogenization, Ventral visual cortex",
author = "Xue Tian and Xin Hao and Yiying Song and Jia Liu",
note = "Funding Information: We thank our children for their participation. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 31861143039 , 31872786 ) and the National Basic Research Program of China ( 2018YFC0810602 ). Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.dcn.2021.101040",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
journal = "Developmental cognitive neuroscience",
issn = "1878-9293",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Homogenization of face neural representation during development

AU - Tian, Xue

AU - Hao, Xin

AU - Song, Yiying

AU - Liu, Jia

N1 - Funding Information: We thank our children for their participation. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 31861143039 , 31872786 ) and the National Basic Research Program of China ( 2018YFC0810602 ). Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors

PY - 2021/12/1

Y1 - 2021/12/1

N2 - Extensive studies have demonstrated that face processing ability develops gradually during development until adolescence. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. One hypothesis is that children and adults represent faces in qualitatively different fashions with different group templates. An alternative hypothesis emphasizes the development as a quantitative change with a decrease of variation in representations. To test these hypotheses, we used between-participant correlation to measure activation pattern similarity both within and between late-childhood children and adults. We found that activation patterns for faces in the fusiform face area and occipital face area were less similar within the children group than within the adults group, indicating children had a greater variation in representing faces. Interestingly, the activation pattern similarity of children to their own group template was not significantly larger than that to adults’ template, suggesting children and adults shared a template in representing faces. Further, the decrease in representation variance was likely a general principle in the ventral visual cortex, as a similar result was observed in a scene-selective region when perceiving scenes. Taken together, our study provides evidence that development of object representation may result from a homogenization process that shifts from greater variance in late-childhood to homogeneity in adults.

AB - Extensive studies have demonstrated that face processing ability develops gradually during development until adolescence. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. One hypothesis is that children and adults represent faces in qualitatively different fashions with different group templates. An alternative hypothesis emphasizes the development as a quantitative change with a decrease of variation in representations. To test these hypotheses, we used between-participant correlation to measure activation pattern similarity both within and between late-childhood children and adults. We found that activation patterns for faces in the fusiform face area and occipital face area were less similar within the children group than within the adults group, indicating children had a greater variation in representing faces. Interestingly, the activation pattern similarity of children to their own group template was not significantly larger than that to adults’ template, suggesting children and adults shared a template in representing faces. Further, the decrease in representation variance was likely a general principle in the ventral visual cortex, as a similar result was observed in a scene-selective region when perceiving scenes. Taken together, our study provides evidence that development of object representation may result from a homogenization process that shifts from greater variance in late-childhood to homogeneity in adults.

KW - Between-Participant Pattern Similarity

KW - Representation development

KW - Representation homogenization

KW - Ventral visual cortex

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85120968035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.dcn.2021.101040

DO - 10.1016/j.dcn.2021.101040

M3 - Article

C2 - 34837875

VL - 52

JO - Developmental cognitive neuroscience

JF - Developmental cognitive neuroscience

SN - 1878-9293

M1 - 101040

ER -

ID: 20809091