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Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells. / Huibregtse, Inge L.; Zaat, Sebatian A.; Kapsenberg, Martien L. et al.

In: Gastroenterology research and practice, Vol. 2012, 2012, p. 639291.

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Huibregtse IL, Zaat SA, Kapsenberg ML, Sartori da Silva MA, Peppelenbosch MP, van Deventer SJH et al. Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells. Gastroenterology research and practice. 2012;2012:639291. doi: 10.1155/2012/639291

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@article{707c25a9eab14d5d9a03125a1756a9c2,
title = "Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells",
abstract = "Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs) to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L. lactis(IL-10)) on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L. lactis(IL-10) induced effector Th-cells thatmarkedly suppressed the proliferation of allogenic Th-cells as compared to L. lactis. This suppressive effect was only seen when DC showed increased CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, enhanced production of IL-10 was measured in both L. lactis(IL-10)-derived DC and Th-cells compared to L. lactis-derived DC and Th-cells. Neutralizing IL-10 duringDC-Th-cell interaction and coculturing L. lactis(IL-10)-derived suppressor Th-cells with allogenic Th-cells in a transwell system prevented the induction of suppressor Th-cells. Only 130 pg/mL of bacterial-derived IL-10 and 40 times more exogenously added recombinant human IL-10 were needed during DC priming for the generation of suppressor Th-cells. The spatially restricted delivery of IL-10 by food-grade bacteria is a promising strategy to induce suppressor Th-cells in vivo and to treat inflammatory diseases",
author = "Huibregtse, {Inge L.} and Zaat, {Sebatian A.} and Kapsenberg, {Martien L.} and {Sartori da Silva}, {Maria A.} and Peppelenbosch, {Maikel P.} and {van Deventer}, {Sander J. H.} and Henri Braat",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1155/2012/639291",
language = "English",
volume = "2012",
pages = "639291",
journal = "Gastroenterology research and practice",
issn = "1687-6121",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells

AU - Huibregtse, Inge L.

AU - Zaat, Sebatian A.

AU - Kapsenberg, Martien L.

AU - Sartori da Silva, Maria A.

AU - Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

AU - van Deventer, Sander J. H.

AU - Braat, Henri

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs) to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L. lactis(IL-10)) on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L. lactis(IL-10) induced effector Th-cells thatmarkedly suppressed the proliferation of allogenic Th-cells as compared to L. lactis. This suppressive effect was only seen when DC showed increased CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, enhanced production of IL-10 was measured in both L. lactis(IL-10)-derived DC and Th-cells compared to L. lactis-derived DC and Th-cells. Neutralizing IL-10 duringDC-Th-cell interaction and coculturing L. lactis(IL-10)-derived suppressor Th-cells with allogenic Th-cells in a transwell system prevented the induction of suppressor Th-cells. Only 130 pg/mL of bacterial-derived IL-10 and 40 times more exogenously added recombinant human IL-10 were needed during DC priming for the generation of suppressor Th-cells. The spatially restricted delivery of IL-10 by food-grade bacteria is a promising strategy to induce suppressor Th-cells in vivo and to treat inflammatory diseases

AB - Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs) to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L. lactis(IL-10)) on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L. lactis(IL-10) induced effector Th-cells thatmarkedly suppressed the proliferation of allogenic Th-cells as compared to L. lactis. This suppressive effect was only seen when DC showed increased CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, enhanced production of IL-10 was measured in both L. lactis(IL-10)-derived DC and Th-cells compared to L. lactis-derived DC and Th-cells. Neutralizing IL-10 duringDC-Th-cell interaction and coculturing L. lactis(IL-10)-derived suppressor Th-cells with allogenic Th-cells in a transwell system prevented the induction of suppressor Th-cells. Only 130 pg/mL of bacterial-derived IL-10 and 40 times more exogenously added recombinant human IL-10 were needed during DC priming for the generation of suppressor Th-cells. The spatially restricted delivery of IL-10 by food-grade bacteria is a promising strategy to induce suppressor Th-cells in vivo and to treat inflammatory diseases

U2 - 10.1155/2012/639291

DO - 10.1155/2012/639291

M3 - Article

C2 - 21811497

VL - 2012

SP - 639291

JO - Gastroenterology research and practice

JF - Gastroenterology research and practice

SN - 1687-6121

ER -

ID: 1471973