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Diabetes prevalence in populations of South Asian Indian and African origins: a comparison of England and the Netherlands. / Agyemang, Charles; Kunst, Anton E.; Bhopal, Raj et al.

In: Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), Vol. 22, No. 4, 2011, p. 563-567.

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@article{471accb70e7d40639fffedad74a25cc7,
title = "Diabetes prevalence in populations of South Asian Indian and African origins: a comparison of England and the Netherlands",
abstract = "We determined whether the overall lower prevalence of type II diabetes in England versus the Netherlands is observed in South-Asian-Indian and African-Caribbean populations. Additionally, we assessed the contribution of health behavior, body size, and socioeconomic position to observed differences between countries. Secondary analyses of population-based standardized individual-level data of 3386 participants were conducted. Indian and African-Caribbean populations had higher prevalence rates of diabetes than whites in both countries. In cross-country comparisons (and similar to whites), Indians residing in England had a lower prevalence of diabetes than those residing in the Netherlands; the prevalence ratio (PR) was 0.35 (95% confidence interval = 0.22 to 0.55) in women and 0.74 (0.50 to 1.10) in men after adjustment for other covariates. Among people of African descent as well, diabetes prevalence was lower in England than in the Netherlands; for women, PR = 0.43 (0.20 to 0.89) and for men, 0.57 (0.21 to 1.49). : The increasing prevalence of diabetes after migration may be modified by the context in which ethnic minority groups live",
author = "Charles Agyemang and Kunst, {Anton E.} and Raj Bhopal and Kenneth Anujuo and Paola Zaninotto and James Nazroo and Mary Nicolaou and Nigel Unwin and {van Valkengoed}, Irene and Redekop, {William Ken} and Karien Stronks",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1097/EDE.0b013e31821d1096",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "563--567",
journal = "Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.)",
issn = "1044-3983",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diabetes prevalence in populations of South Asian Indian and African origins: a comparison of England and the Netherlands

AU - Agyemang, Charles

AU - Kunst, Anton E.

AU - Bhopal, Raj

AU - Anujuo, Kenneth

AU - Zaninotto, Paola

AU - Nazroo, James

AU - Nicolaou, Mary

AU - Unwin, Nigel

AU - van Valkengoed, Irene

AU - Redekop, William Ken

AU - Stronks, Karien

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - We determined whether the overall lower prevalence of type II diabetes in England versus the Netherlands is observed in South-Asian-Indian and African-Caribbean populations. Additionally, we assessed the contribution of health behavior, body size, and socioeconomic position to observed differences between countries. Secondary analyses of population-based standardized individual-level data of 3386 participants were conducted. Indian and African-Caribbean populations had higher prevalence rates of diabetes than whites in both countries. In cross-country comparisons (and similar to whites), Indians residing in England had a lower prevalence of diabetes than those residing in the Netherlands; the prevalence ratio (PR) was 0.35 (95% confidence interval = 0.22 to 0.55) in women and 0.74 (0.50 to 1.10) in men after adjustment for other covariates. Among people of African descent as well, diabetes prevalence was lower in England than in the Netherlands; for women, PR = 0.43 (0.20 to 0.89) and for men, 0.57 (0.21 to 1.49). : The increasing prevalence of diabetes after migration may be modified by the context in which ethnic minority groups live

AB - We determined whether the overall lower prevalence of type II diabetes in England versus the Netherlands is observed in South-Asian-Indian and African-Caribbean populations. Additionally, we assessed the contribution of health behavior, body size, and socioeconomic position to observed differences between countries. Secondary analyses of population-based standardized individual-level data of 3386 participants were conducted. Indian and African-Caribbean populations had higher prevalence rates of diabetes than whites in both countries. In cross-country comparisons (and similar to whites), Indians residing in England had a lower prevalence of diabetes than those residing in the Netherlands; the prevalence ratio (PR) was 0.35 (95% confidence interval = 0.22 to 0.55) in women and 0.74 (0.50 to 1.10) in men after adjustment for other covariates. Among people of African descent as well, diabetes prevalence was lower in England than in the Netherlands; for women, PR = 0.43 (0.20 to 0.89) and for men, 0.57 (0.21 to 1.49). : The increasing prevalence of diabetes after migration may be modified by the context in which ethnic minority groups live

U2 - 10.1097/EDE.0b013e31821d1096

DO - 10.1097/EDE.0b013e31821d1096

M3 - Article

C2 - 21610499

VL - 22

SP - 563

EP - 567

JO - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.)

JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.)

SN - 1044-3983

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 1443583